Salsa music clipart public domain

Oct 28 2019

Various music writers and historians have traced the use of salsa to different periods of the 20th century. Max Salazar traces the word back to the early 1930s, when Ignacio Piñeiro composed “Échale salsita”, a Cuban son protesting tasteless food. While Salazar describes this song as the origin of salsa meaning “danceable Latin music”, Ed Morales describes the usage in the same song as a cry from Piñeiro to his band, telling them to increase the tempo to “put the dancers into high gear”. Morales claims that later in the 1930s, vocalist Beny Moré would shout salsa during a performance “to acknowledge a musical moment’s heat, to express a kind of cultural nationalist sloganeering [and to celebrate the] ‘hotness’ or ‘spiciness’ of Latin American cultures”. World music author Sue Steward claims salsa was originally used in music as a “cry of appreciation for a particularly piquant or flashy solo”. She cites the first use in this manner to a Venezuelan radio DJ named Phidias Danilo Escalona; In 1955 Cheo Marquetti created a new band called Conjunto Los Salseros and recorded some new songs ( Sonero and Que no muera el son ). In 1955 José Curbelo recorded some others salsa songs (La familia, La la la and Sun sun sun ba bae).
The contemporary meaning of salsa as a musical genre can be traced back to New York City Latin music promoter Izzy Sanabria:

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